Tag Archive for 'custom foil'

Pub Pass

Do you like beer? How about an excuse to try a lot of different beers? How about a guide to bars around the Twin Cities? Behold, the PubPass was practically created just for you! The concept is pretty genius: you buy the Pub Pass booklet for $25 bucks and then at each bar included in the book (25 of them) you get a free beer! If we did the math correctly (we’re not usually here to do math), that works out to a dollar a beer, what a deal.

Not to mention, you get this oh-so-perdy passport book to keep track of your adventure. We were stoked to produce the covers, stamping 1 metallic gold foil and 1 pigment white foil onto a 20 pt chipboard before scoring and sending off to Shapco for binding (also where the gutt was offset printed).

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Foiled by Studio On Fire

That’s right folks, we’ve added hot foil stamping to our repertoire of specialty in-house processes.

One of the best things about foil is, unlike our letterpress inks which are transparent, foil is opaque, allowing us to apply a lighter color on a dark background (see this blog post to read about  letterpress printing with white inks on black stocks).

As designers we love(!) tiny type, but as printers, we know there are limits to what is realistically achievable. With that in mind we created a set of specimen cards, exploring different type sizes using the two fonts we use for our identity. From the reasonable 11pt type all the way down to the petite 5pt italic Baskerville, the foil held up pretty well, though the fidelity at these sizes can’t always be guaranteed–it’s going to change from typeface to typeface.

With letterpress printing we recommend tracking out your type (at least to 25 or 50) to give room for impression between letters. For foiling we recommend the same, this keeps letterforms from merging into one blobby mess on press.

We found that the metallic foils (gold, silver, copper, etc) released a lot cleaner than some of the pigment foils (colored foils, such as the blue foil shown below). We definitely wouldn’t recommend getting too tiny with the pigment foils.