Serious Foodies Business Cards

We just love folks that can blur the line between the disciplines of design and illustration. Jessica Hische is certainly one of those rarities. Be sure and check out her site for more great hand lettering and typography. She designed these business cards for new project by Mischa and Jacob DeHart called Culinary Culture – A Site for Serious & Aspiring Foodies.

We letterpress printed these cards on 220lb Crane Lettra, 100% cotton stock. They are printed three colors on the logo side and two colors on the text side. Additionally, the logo side needed the dark red run as two passes – something we often do in letterpress when there is a solid area of color and text on the same plate. The heavy ink density needed to cover a solid versus the light ink density for text lets the type remain crisp and the solid run as saturated as possible. (That means this piece of paper ran through the press six times – four on front, two on back.)

And of course they just wouldn’t be complete without some edge coloring. These have a contrasting green edge which is nice and noticeable on the thick 220lb stock. We usually recommend edge coloring be applied to stock heavier than 160lbC. Coloring can be applied to thinner sheets, but the effect is more pronounced with thicker paper._0000_culinary_culture_business_cards


    • Beautiful work. I’m curious: Is the light-red oval at the top of the wine glass the only use of that color? What would have happened if you had used the same red from the rest of the card but inked that oval only once and the rest of the wine in the glass twice. Would that give a similar effect, or would the distinction be too small to notice?

    • Yes, that is the only use of that color. When a color is specified as a screen value that same color, the best way to achieve difference is as a separate spot color. In this case the light pink was specified as 50% of the darker color. If we print as a screen value the effect is a screened value – like a grayscale newspaper photo. A double hit of ink does not equate to the same effect as running a separate spot color.

    • I’m curious as well, deriving from J’s question. If a person was really trying to limit press runs in this case – if you were to run the pink oval in the pass with the lower red ink density type and the wine itself in the pass with the heavy ink density solid area of color, would you see a noticeable amount of contrast between the two passes when the objects were adjoining, as in this instance?

    • No, the contrast would not be significant enough to produce a quality effect here. The word “culture” is run lighter, the area around the white cartouche shape is run darker, but the same ink color is used. This is barely perceptible in the photos and in the final printed project.

    • My question is: How much did this batch cost? For real. Those cards are great.

    • All our work is custom to the client specifications and quantities, we are not at liberty disclose client budgets. However, if you need an estimate on a live project, just shoot us an email.

    • these are amazing! your work is totally amazing… i’m dying to learn how to color edges. where could i learn how to do this? (i’m in brooklyn)
      xojulie

    • We never got a lesson in edge painting, so I’m not sure where you could learn. We’ve developed a system for doing the edge painting that has taken us a couple years to perfect and adjust for all the variables that come with different stocks. We do a fair amount of edge painting, even for other commercial printers, so we are a bit secretive on how we do it. Sorry I can be of help here, we need to protect the R&D time we’ve invested.

      Ask a letterpress question, and I’m happy to help.

    • These are really works of art every time I come here I am in awe of what is created I love the use of the color and how you have used green on the outside of the cards. It just adds some thing just can’t put my finger on it.

    • i totally understand… your work is lovely, thanks for the inspiration!